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YokoKurama

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  1. Support this, +1.    At the current rate, one main source of pokeyen income arise from the market of held items, which can briefly be categorized into the following methods:   1. Catching staryu (and shellder), whose conspicuous cons include the expenditure of the relatively pricy pokeballs. (200 yen a pokeball. If one were to do a statistical calculation to show the average rate of return from catching said pokemon for their respective held items, it's not difficult to see how big the role of pokeballs plays.)   2. Catching paras in the safari, which I believe remain
  2.   Seems like you're the one not making any sense.   What can Skarmory do to cripple nidoking?   spikes? fire blast, dead.   toxic? sorry, immune.   taunt? LOL sure go ahead.   roar? Yeah go ahead, eat a fire blast.   ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------   Umbreon cripples nidoking?   toxic? sorry, immunity   mean look+baton pass? not working atm (if it does umbreon would actually be a wall-disabler,
  3.   If you had predicted every single move, you clearly should know that your opponent would switch out a corresponding wall and thus, instead of blindly attacking the predicted wall, should take out your wallbreaker instead?    Hence double-switching.      >someone clearly didn't read this thread.       "Oh but he had his skarmory/blissey out and I'm stuck with that thing while I know he's going to status me next!!!"   >Nidoking.
  4. Considering many of the "professionals" often make the same mistakes listed above in official and unofficial tourneys, I'd say everyone makes mistakes.   The article above summarizes all the mistakes both "professionals" and "amateurs" often tend to make, either because of forgetfulness, tiredness, or to some extent, their failure to understand the concepts.   Not only will this article assist amateurs to understand the concepts, professionals can always read the article and review what mistakes they had made in previous tournaments, instead of flaming and whining about a simple
  5.   There's always room for improvement, regardless of your being a noob or a pro.    I myself appreciate OT's effort to assist the community with this article. A great read indeed!
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